January 12, 2013, Week 1: Technology-Related Ideas and Final Presentations

R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 1 Agenda:

  1. Bonk to briefly explain the syllabus.
  2. What do you already know about R546 content?
    1. Brainstorm in groups your prior knowledge about instructional strategies.
    2. Present results in team competitions.
    3. Summarize as a class.
    4. Are we done?
  3. Comedy: Three things you know about the syllabus.
  4. Explain course and syllabus
  5. Course Goals and Facts:

a. Rich course history...

b. Course Texts and Book of Readings: PDF

d. Course goals: Brain like mush, learn 4-5 things can use, get labels, become a leader, see 4 main areas as integrated yet distinct, see some new resources.

e. Books and resources that I have.

g. Laminated card/cheat sheet idea...

h. Possible guest speakers?

  1. Ball toss: New things about the syllabus?
  2. Student questions and discussion.
  3. Short Break #1…
  4. Curt Bonk presents recap of 100+ instructional strategies.
  5. Discussion and class activities and demonstrations.
  6. Break #2.
  7. Bonk to present his R2D2 model and ideas.
  8. Discussion and class activities and demonstrations.
  9. Break #3.
  10. Bonk to present his TEC-VARIETY model.
  11. Discussion and class activities and demonstration.
  12. Break #4.
  13. If time allows, Bonk to briefly mention his methods for teaching via videoconferencing, and other technology integration ideas.
  14. Student questions.
  15. Other?

 

                             January 19th, 2013, Week 2: Cooperative Learning Methods Specific

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                                     Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 2 Agenda:

1.Administrivia

2. Bonk to Lecture on Cooperative and Collaborative Learning

3. Videotape: Cooperative learning or Jigsaw

1. Venn Diagram or ANY visual--compare the learner-centered characteristics with

a. Your work setting, and,

b. Your goals for a psychologically safe environment

(See, for examples, Venn Diagram).

4. CL Pondering Questions

5. History of the field: Cooperative Teaching Scripts

6. Generic Methods: How make sense of these? Who has used the most?

a. Stand, Raise Hand, Leg, etc. and Admit

b. Cooperative Learning: Five Models

c. 3 CL types/formats: Formal/Lesson, Informal/Partner, Home/Base

7. Quiz on cooperative learning from packet of handouts.

8. Top Ten List: How can you spot a teacher using cooperative learning ineffectively???

9. Review packet of handouts and other questions

10. Jigsaw or Elliot Aronson in YouTube

a. Turn to your partner and...

11. Basic Principles (PIGS Face)

a. HOG FARMER: Have your Objectives; Group size,

F (4F's), Assigning students, Room arrangements, Materials, Ensuring interdependence, Roles.

12. Building Positive Interdependence

13. Building Individual Accountability

14. Building Social Skills and Trust...(4 F's)

a. Trust or group bonding: How do you create it? (fav restaurant, pet type, relative, proudest accom, if I were rich, a good movie, best parttime job, travel)

b. Consensus Seeking/Reading:    1. Do you like spinach?

2. Do you like the weather today?

3. Limit lecture today?

15. Grouping Strategies

a. Group Processing

16. Grading Strategies

17. Reaching Difficult Students

a. Reaching Difficult Students

18. Critical Friend Activity

19. Review of Key Pts: in book you read (so far) (Three Step Interviews, BOB)

a. Line up by date born. Pair up and group by month born.

b. In pairs, interview partner for 5 minutes (max) and jot down notes

1. What is important about this book?

2. What is a interesting that caught your eye?

3. What is a dumb idea?

c. Reverse roles (for another 5 minutes)

d. Pairs join to form groups of four

e. Roundrobin sharing what you learned in the interview

f. Alt: Jigsaw into various chapter expert groups and summarize main pts.

20. I cross my legs and hope for Break #1

a. Top Ten List: How can you spot a teacher using cooperative learning ineffectively???

21. Structured Controversy Task

a. You will be assigned to 1 of 4 groups (Group by type of car drive). Please be prepared to

make 3-4 arguments for the position you have been given using your text, lecture, and video.

b. What to do when you disagree???

 d1. I think CL is just a fad vs. no, CL is really here to stay...

 d2. Group Grades vs. Individual vs. No Grades

 d3. Ignore CL--assessed by basics vs. tests changing--teamwork is the new basic.

22. Solid vs. Fuzzy in Groups of Four

a. Three Stay, One Stray--Buzz Groups--Roundtable.

b. Alt #1: #'d Heads Together (Count off 1, 2, 3, 4) & Roundrobin & Blackboard Share.

23. 13 Reading assignments: Read, Summarize, and Discuss: Convince others that yours is best.

24. What did you learn?

25. More Generic Coop. Learning (Simple Structures, Mid-level strategies, Class Assess Tech, Kagan)

a. Circle those you have used or know about...

b. Stand and Share: Which items did you circle? Why and what would you do???

26. How do you spell RELIEF??? Of course, it's "Break #2"

27. COOPERATIVE LEARNING SPECIFIC:

a. Rdg Methods: rdg is active, constructive, no 1 best method, not ego-enhancing competitive process.

1. Reciprocal Teaching scripts... (Roles: Tchr, #1, #2, #3, #4, Jim, Barbara...)

2. Try READERS on readings.

3. Try READER on readings.

4. Paired Repeated Reading on Chapter in book you selected

5. Cooperative reading with different purposes: teacher, parent who fights it in book you have

b. Writing Methods

1. Traditional: peer reviewers, conferences, newsletters, local publishing

2. Electronic: Google Docs, Ning, ePals, iEARN, etc.

c. SCIENCE METHODS

1. Circle sample lessons you already use or could use...

2. What else: Additional Thinking skill links!!! (circle one)

28. Everything is Getting FUZZY: Break #3 Back Stretching and Limbering Up...

29. Cooperative Learning: Important vs. Fad class debate.

30. Complete notecard on Low, Medium, and High Risk strategies: Find a matching card.

31. Top 3 activity.

32. CL Summary.


January 26, 2013, Week 3: Critical Thinking Defined and Explained

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                                     Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Quotes:

Vygotsky: "What children can do together today, they can do on their own tomorrow."

Johnson & Johnson: "No one of is as smart as all of us." But, "It seems a little late to ask a 40 year old engineer to work more effectively in a team."

Unknown: "Copying is complementing."

 

Week 3 Agenda:

  1. Finish module on Cooperative and Collaborative Learning.
  2. Jot down 2-3 ways you have used CL in past 2 years and label

3.      Value Line: Rate your use of CR, CT, CL:

Low Medium High

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10               1. Creative Thinking

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10               2. Critical Thinking

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10               3. Cooperative Learning

  1. 28. Wrap up--Create/Modify a New Lesson

a. Draw your vision of Cooperative Learning: your roadmap, flowchart, or mnemonic

1. How might you use CL next year?, what % of time?, what combo of CR/CT/CL?

(Jot down 2-3 ways might use and label methods like jigsaw is known)

2. Write a philosophical statement, goals, method selection, assessment.

(What is your guiding metaphor of school/teaching (e.g., tour bus, family, museum))

  1. Brainstorm ways to increase CL, CT, and CR in your work environment.
  2. Reverse brainstorm ways to decrease CL, CT, and CR in your work environment.
  3. Debate with colleagues what would happen if these techniques inc in your workplace.
  4. Describe technique modifications, roles, grouping strats, and other CL principles.
  5. Break #1.

 

  1. Bonk to lecture on critical thinking.
  2. Question: What is the purpose of this class? Why do I teach it? Why did you take it? What is the underlying theme here?
  3. Human Graph (1-5); 1 = Strongly agree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly disagree (e.g., Rank order the books for this class: Davis, Packet of Handouts, the Room, extra book, your peers, Indiana basketball team this year, etc.)
  4. Phillips 66 on book selected.
  5.  Important and interesting vs. Dumb ideas of that book.
  6. Critical thinking tests and assessments

a. Watson-Glaser Critical Think Appraisal: Form A--Sample Items #1 & #2

b. Cornell Test of Critical Thinking (see handout)--Try questions 1-10.

  1. Visual Thinking Activities: Graphic Organizers:
    1. Cmaps, diagrams, flowcharts, graphs, attribute wheels
    2. Venn Diagrams (e.g., compare CR & CT)
    3. Categorization/Classification Schemes:
    4. Taxonomies, timelines, outlines, advance organizers, main idea tables
    5. Semantic Feature Analysis: (e.g., 12 or 14 LCPs by grade or domain)
    6. Mnemonics--acrostics, acronyms, pegword, story, link, keyword, bizarre
  2. Evaluative Questions (Is the Earth flat; Random Blooming Verbs)
    1. Case A (IU-B): Higher Ed considering funding a CR/CT center
    2. Case B (IUS and IUPUI): High School is considering a course on CT & CR thinking
  3. Break
  4. 10. Critical Thinking: Rate checklist.

a. Rate these skills on a scale of 1-5 as important in your work setting.

b. Write down sample occupations where these are important.

  1. Critical thinking definitions. Write your personal definition.
  2. Venn Diagram on critical and creative thinking.
  3. 25 Critical Thinking Techniques

a. What Constitutes Good Thinking

b. Critical Thinking Defined and Separated by Grade Levels

c. Inductive and Deductive Thought

d. 6 Aspects of Critical Thinking

e. Highlights from the CT research

f. Critical Thinking: Recommended Reading

g. Gubbins' Matrix of Thinking Skills

h. Laminated Card

I. Sternberg's 8 ways to fail

  1. Writing

a. Summing Up/Nutshell/Review: What have you learned so far???

b. One minute papers: Most impt and muddiest point from yesterday...

c. Think Sheets, Procedural Facilitation, Guided Questions

d. Goal Concretization

e. Conferencing, Peer Review of Writing, Revision

  1. Pick a Video (student choice or assistant instructor choice)…
  2. Thinking at Right Angles: Watch video…

1. Have you ever taught/scaffolded like this?

2. Speaker and Listener: listener writes down idea #1 on the horizontal

 and then associated thoughts on the vertical and then switch roles

  1. Identify patterns, other points of view, q's, factors and consequences
  2. Capture associated ideas and listen to your partner by eliciting examples, and similar incidents. The organizer helps focus on listening and connecting.

 

 


 

                                February 2, 2013, Week 4: Critical Thinking Methods

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                           Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 4 Agenda:

1. Summary of critical thinking activities from last time.

3. Pruning the tree activity: I am thinking of a critical thinking technique…

4. Value lines: motivation, creative thinking, critical thinking, and cooperative learning.

5. Writing, Questioning, Pondering

a. Fat and Skinny Questions: discuss/explain & think thru vs. 1 word/yes-no, head shake.

(Note: Think Sheets, Procedural Facilitation, Guided Questions

Fat Questions: require lots of discussion and explanation with interesting examples and take time to think through and answer in depth.

Skinny Q's:      require simple yes/no/maybe or a 1 word answer or nod or head shake and take limited amounts of time to answer.

6. Share PMI on this course so far...

7. Force Field Analysis on Prob: Finishing final projects--Forces against/Allies

8. Goal Concretization (Peer review, conferencing, revision???)

9. Small Bladder Break #2

10. Idea Listing Activities

a. Plus-Minus-Interesting: do a P-M-I on this course so far

b. Force Field Analysis on Prob: Finishing final projects--Forces against/Allies

c. K-W-L (What did you know?, What do you want to know?, What did you learn?)--

  1. Other Points of View; Considering All Factors; Examining Both Sides of Argument.
  2. SWOT analysis: The creation of a Center for Thinking at IU.

11. Idea Listing Activities (many are Edward de Bono's Methods)

1. K-W-L (What did you know?, What do you want to know?, What did you learn?)--

Topic: Creativity or Creative Thinking or Creativity Strategies

2. PMI: Plus, Minus, Interesting

a. Do a P-M-I on this course so far

b. Should marriage be a renewable 5 year contract?

c. Should all cars be painted yellow?

3. APC: Alt's, Possibilities, & Choices (The tasks) (This is CR BS!)

a. Rush hour traffic problems in large cities.

b. Packaging of chocolate bars.

c. Competitor cuts the price of toilet paper.

d. A young man is seen pouring beer in his car's gas tank. What happened?

4. FIP: First Important Priorities (e.g., what tasks to do for this class)

a. What should the priorities be in running a school?

b. If you were organizing a party, what would your priorities be?

c. How should a career be chosen?

5. AGO: Aims, Goals, Objectives

a. What are your objectives when you turn on the TV?

b. What are your objectives in taking this course?

c. If you were a spacecraft commander approaching Earth, what are your objectives?

6. OPV: Other People's Views

a. In a teacher strike, how many points of view are involved?

b. Tasks we choose in P506--what points of view are involved?

c. Success of your workshops will come from what points of view?

7. C&S: Consequence & Sequel (of an action or decision)

(immed; ST (1-5 yrs), medium (5-20 yrs), LT (over 20 yrs) (e.g., this class)

a. A boy is on vacation and his best friend steals his girlfriend.

b. The invention of a harmless happiness pill.

c. All office work can be done at home via a computer.

8. CAF: Considering All Factors

(a) Buying a second hand car, (b) Choosing a place to live, 8 Choosing a spouse.

9. FI - FO: Info In (Already accounted for) - Info Out (Unknown/still needed)

a. Buying a house or borrowing money.

b. Choosing a place to go on a vacation.

c. Giving a party.

10. EBS: Examining Both Sides of an Argument

a. Nuclear Power Stations, WWW Censorship, National Healthcare

11. ADI: Agree, Disagree, Irrelevant

12. I Keep Holdin On For Break #1

13. Other things to do with #5 above

a. Debate: teach as a course in middle/high school or wait till college???

b. Debate: CT/CR should be (a) a separate course, (b) added on w/n, 8 embedded.

c. Identify Main Pts--What were the main pts made?

d. Cost-Benefit Analyses--new course on CT/CR thinking skills for mid/h. s. students.

14. Working backward, working forward, pruning the tree, 20 questions

1. I am thinking of a place that houses the Center for the Study of Math.

2. I am thinking of a creative thinking technique.

3. I am thinking of a critical thinking technique.

15. I Keep Holdin On For Break #2

16. More Tall Tale Story Telling...

17. The name game... (CR and CT)


February 9, 2013, Week 5: Creative Thinking Defined

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                           Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 5 Agenda:

1. Administrivia: Next week turn in Task II: Reflection and Personal Exploration Activities

2. Bonk to Lecture on Creativity

3. Pick a model of Creative Problem Solving and try to improve it.

(e.g., Polya, Osburn, Parnes, Oech, Wallas, AUTA, Torrance, BS, Future PS).

a. Share Models Selected...Is there a true problem solving process that works for you???

c. Assessment dilemmas: validity and reliability.

4. Creative Whack Pack and other card packs

a. What can you do to teach or enhance creativity in your school/work setting?

            b. Find a match.

            c. Call to action.

            d. How can you use these cards?

5. Fishbowl: What if you taught like Robin Williams in Dead Poets Society?

6. Breaker Breaker, Good Buddy, We need a Break #1...

7. Matching

8. Review of List of 25 creative thinking techniques...

9. What was the muddiest point for creative thinking section?

  1. Morphy Exercise: Paired pick and choose

a. Write down 2-4 best CR and CL techniques we have heard of.

b. Roundrobin on top ten list of CR and CL (each).

c. Morphological Synthesis or Checkerboard to create a new technique.

d. Think of example of how you would use.

e. Share

 More review

a. Categorize AS A CLASS ACTIVITY CT vs. CR techniques

b. Partner Review

c. Read off cards...

  1. More Tall Tale Story Telling...

11. Rearrange facts/what if (Pick one and write for a minute):

 1. What-if no one studied creativity and we had no understanding of creative processes?

 2. What-if no one assessed creativity? There were no cr measures or researchers?

 3. Just suppose you were in charge of curriculum? How would you address cr?

 4. What if we had standardized creativity or coop. learning tests in Indiana?

 5. What-if creative thinking was more prevalent in dogs than human beings?

 6. If people didn't need to sleep, would we be more creative in morning or at night?

 7. Suppose the Japanese were well known for creativity and creativity assessment?

 8. What-if more creative people lived 20 years longer than non less creative?

 9. What-if in 20 years, creativity became equated with intelligence?

 10. What would teaching creative thinking be like if we lived life in reverse...???

 11. Just suppose Indiana assessed the level of dept. thoughtfulness? Would tchg be different?

  1. Which items would you like on your teacher report card?

12. Just suppose teachers were asked to assess the level of student thinking?

What would teaching be like? What would learning be like?

  1. 12. Flexibility/Breaking Set Activity

a. New Perspectives, Metaphoric Thkg, Analogies, Synectics, Breaking Set, Imagery, Aesthetics,

  1.  Finding New Patterns, Juxtaposing Ideas, Seeing Functional Fixity, etc...
  2. See: Word games; Which one is different; Nine dots; Flying Pig; Davis; Synectics: Direct, Personal, and Fantasy Analogies; Concealed colors, sentences/words; 13 original colonies
  3. Go through course packet of handouts.
  4. Future Problem solving videos in YouTube.

 


February 16, 2013, Week 6: Creativity Thinking Methods

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                           Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 6 Agenda:

1. Administrivia

a. Dress Down and Out Day is next week--exercise your risk muscle

1. clothes your grandmother would pick out at a rummage sale;

2. clothes from another country;

3. something you would be embarrassed to wear;

4. something nifty, something cute;

5. your favorite clothes;

6. your oldest set of clothes; or,

5. bring back the disco days; happy days are here again.

9. Bonk Creativity Lecture Continued.

a. Creativity Intro...Creativity is...??? What is creativity?

10. Question 1: How would you foster creativity?

11. Question 2: Are you creative? List 5 examples.

12. Creativity (rate yourself, fill out handout from yesterday)--Are you creative?

a. Experimental-safekeeping self rating (which are you???)

a. Find your spot

b. von Oech's Explorer, Artist, Judge, Warrior

c. Right vs. Left Brained

13. More Creative Dramatics (Davis’ 5th edition, pp. 297-306):

a. Imagine taste/smell...People Machines, Imagine hear, touch, smell, tastes.

b. Invisible ball tossing.

c. Just Imagine: served in Vietnam.

d. Favorite animal poses, ridiculous poses, stiffest/most rubbery, angriest/happiest.

e. Mirrors, puppets, ice cubes.

14. Discussion on text so far...


15. Creativity Techniques

a. Tell a tall tale...give an example of an idea squelching statement.

1. Which idea squelcher are the most common for you? Create a new one.

2. Stand and sit...give an example of an idea squelching statement.

b. Object Obituary--write an obituary for an object you recently trashed...

c. Humor: Davis' Book--Write a new witty title for this book.

d. Metaphorical Thinking: On the meaning of creativity:

1. Creativity is like ____. Being Creative is like ____. Creativity is to ___ as...

16. Break #2

17. More Creative Reflection Exercises:

a. Wet ink on most constructivist/hands-on high school teacher. She/he was like a ______.

b. Wet Ink II. Just imagine: imagine you have created a psychologically safe envir...

What do you see? Can students wonder, question, speculate, take risks, active listening, respect for ideas, withhold judgment, seek justification??? How is creativity fostered here? Describe environment. Physically, mentally, emotionally, etc...

18. Brainstorming--more is better, wilder the better, hitchhiking encour, no eval, combine

a. Brainstorm: ways to increase use of creative thinking in schools?

b. Reverse BS: ways to decrease use of creative thinking in schools?

19. Flexibility/Breaking set activity

See: Word games; Which one is different; Nine dots; Flying Pig; Concealed colors; 13 original colonies.

20. If time:

a. Creative teaching and teachers in YouTube?

b. Go through course packet of handouts.

 

2. Share Sample Student Work--curriculum brainstorms

a. Wet Ink and outline beginning to a thought paper or brainstorming reflection...

3. CNN Videotapes: Creativity, Constructivism, Problem-Based Learning, Odyssey of Mind

4. More Creative Reflection Exercises:

a. Wet Ink II on most constructivist/hands-on h. s. teacher. She/he was like a ______.

b. Wet Ink II. Just imagine: imagine you have created a psychologically safe envir...

What do you see? Can students wonder, question, speculate, take risks, active listening, respect for ideas, withhold judgment, seek justification??? How is creativity fostered here? Describe environment. Physically, mentally, emotionally, etc...

c. Tell a tall tale...just imagine you have created a environment that is not safe for learning.  What do you see? How is creativity squelched here. Please use 3-4 idea squelching statements in your story.

5. Creativity Intro--10 strats definitions......Creativity is...??? What is creativity???

6. Brainstorming--more is better, wilder the better, hitchhiking encour, no eval, combine

a. Brainstorm: ways to increase use of creative thinking in schools?

b. Reverse BS: ways to decrease use of creative thinking in schools?

7. Discussion on Davis text so far...(Phillips 66, PMI Twist)

8. Small Bladder Break #1

9. Reflections and questions

10. Attribute Listing, Modification, and Transformation (Davis pp. 178-186)

a. Attribute Webbing/Listing: "XYZ" shapes, colors, sizes, purpose, numbering.

b. Attribute Modification: "XYZ"--after listing attributes, think of ways to improve each.

c. Alternative Uses: Uses for "XYZ" for this class or for teaching in general.

(find the second best or third best suggestion)

d. Attribute Transferring: "XYZ"--transfer ideas from one context to the next.

(with idea spurring questions--p. 80; Davis 184-186)

(What else is this like? What have others done? What else is this like? What could we copy? What has worked before?)

(What can we borrow from a carnival, funeral parlor, track meet, wild west)

e. Idea Spurring Questions: how MAXimize, MAGnify, arrangeRE, combine-adapt, subtutesti, EEEXXXAAGGGGGEEERRRAAATTTEEE, add new twist, modifie, ChAnGe


 

13. Break #2: Hello Houston, my bladder needs another break...

14. Make Shift Fishbowl: What if taught like this, would you be fired. (Front Row, Back Row)

a. Handout on John Campbell

b. With six hats

15. The Creativity Case: Class Discussion with 27 Thinking Roles

a. Can we increase student/worker creativity?

16. Rate yourself...

a. Davis' "I am a creative person" self rating

b. von Oech's Explorer, Artist, Judge, Warrior

c. Right vs. Left Brained

17. Creativity Assessment

a. Why measure? How assess?

b. What measures are there?

1. Torrance: Cardboard Boxes (Activity #5: Unusual Uses)

2. Remote Associations Test

3. Williams: Parent/Teacher Rating (try for a son, daughter, cousin)

4. Schaefer: Creativity Attitude Survey

c. Assessment dilemmas

d. Design a creativity test item and give to neighbor to take,.

18. For Next time: Models of Creative Problem Solving--pick a model you like & improve it.

(e.g., Polya, Osburn, Parnes, Oech, Wallas, AUTA, Torrance, BS, Future PS.

19. And I had a dog named "Bingo": The Bingo Quiz!

  1. Ball toss review.
  2. Categorize AS A CLASS ACTIVITY CT vs. CR techniques

 

 


February 23, 2013, Week 7: Motivation Defined and Explained

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                           Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 7 Agenda:

1. TASKs BEFORE WE START

a. Try Scrambled Cities and I.Q. Test Handouts

b. Phillips 66 on the Davis book so far.

2. Administrivia

a. Any book or other problems or issues???

b. For next time: Bring one educational object.

3. Bonk to lecture on motivation

4. Minute Paper Summary

a. Review a few key points from yesterday (on chart paper--left)

b. 2nd summary--Now create an outrageous summary (on chart paper--right)

5. What is motivation??? (Webbing) What do the techniques have in common???

Webbing can be used to determine: (1) all the possible directions and activities a student or class can explore as a result of interest in a specific topic or subject, (2) all that is presently known, and (3) knowledge interrelationships. This technique expands awareness for relating, integrating, and organizing brainstormed ideas. Directions: write the topic in the center and link closely related ideas or questions in the first ring of ideas. As new ideas are suggested, they are connected by a line to the related item or items.

6. Motivation: link corporate and academic motivation

a. 33 highlights of research on strats for motivating to learn (Jere Brophy)

b. 150 ways to increase intrinsic motivation (James Raffini)

c. 1001 ways to energize employees (Bob Nelson)

d. 10 internal motivation online techniques (Dennen and Bonk, in press)

7. Break

8. Active Learning Assessments--Rate self, rate department, rate students.

a. Create a scenario or lesson wherein 5 of these 10 interconnections were used.

b. Just suppose Indiana assessed the level of dept. thoughtfulness...

Which items would you like on your teacher report card?

What would teaching be like? Would you feel secure?

c. Just suppose teachers were asked to assess the level of student thinking...

Select questions that could be added to a student report card.

What would teaching be like? What would learning be like?

9.                  7. Activity: Have you ever?

10.              Write 4-5 initial expectations for this course

a. Expectations Flip Chart: share of 1-2 of these...

b. Business Card or Notecard idea.

11.              5. Little known facts Part 1: Inquisitors and Confessors.

12.              Little known facts Part 2: write on cards and turn in.

13.              Communication/Learning Visuals--Draw one or more of the following: Gun, cannon, noose, high fives, thumbs up, watch, toilet, smiley face, etc.

14.              Index Card: What is unique about you???

a. Favorite Sports/teams/hobbies/past times (upper left)

b. Birthplace and Favorite cities to visit (upper right)

c. Past and/or current jobs (lower left)

d. 2 comments, things, or traits about yourself (e.g., team player, personable, talkative,

opinionated, hate Purdue, like movies, move a lot, hate sports) (lower right)

e. Course expectations (in the middle)

15.              Dead Poets Society Part 1.

16.              Treasure Hunt (find 2-3 others like you)

17.              Middle name and nickname game...(why and how was that name chosen)

18.              Videotape: Dead Poets Society Part II and III

 


                            March 2, 2013, Week 8: Motivation Theory and Technique

      R546: Instructional Strategies for Thinking, Collaboration, and Motivation

                                                           Instructor: Curt Bonk

 

Week 8 Agenda Motivation and Final Papers:

  1. Continue Bonk Lecture and Demonstration of Motivation.
  2. Coat of Arms (see Book of Handouts).

#1: a recent Peak Performance;

#2: something very few people know;

#3: draw a symbol of how you spend your free time;

#4: fill in something you are really good at;

#5: write in something that epitomizes your personal motto.

  1. Self-disclosure introductions...

a. Take out two items (e.g., family pictures, credit cards, rabbits' feet)

b. Describe themselves (e.g., "I am a tightwad," "I am superstitious"

c. State name with an adjective starting with 1st letter of 1st name.

(e.g., Marvelous Mary, Dancing Diane, Inscrutable Ida, Crusty Curt)

d. Now intro self & also by a nickname current, past, or potential nickname.

(ask others what it means during break)

e. Brainstorm a list of questions you would like to ask the others...

(e.g., My person I most admire is? The best book I ever read?)

  1. Accomplishment Hunt

a. Turn in 2-3 accomplishments (e.g., past summer, during college, during life);

b. Instructor lists those on a sheet;

c. Students have to ask "Is this you?" If yes, get a signature.

  1. Metaphorical thinking

a. how is my school like:         a prison, a beehive, an orchestra, ghetto, expedition, garden, family, herd, artist's palette, machine, military camp, Olympic games, hospital, theater.

b. how is life like a supermarket????

  1. The shift in teaching

a. Models of learning

b. Consultative vs. Traditional Teaching

c. Shifting views on learning

  1. Learner-Centeredness and Constructivism: Resource Model
  2. Active Learning Assessments: Rate self, rate department, rate students.
  3. Video perhaps…Dead Poets Clip Part 2
  4. Break #2
  5. Psychic Massage of instructors….and students?
  6. Motivation (Best of the Best Competition)

a. 33 highlights of research on strats for motivating to learn (Jere Brophy)

b. 150 ways to increase intrinsic motivation (James Raffini)

c. 1001 ways to energize employees (Bob Nelson)

d. 200 ways to motivate secondary students

  1. Webbing:

a. Part I: What is creativity, critical thinking, cooperative learning?

b. Part II: What is active learning (i.e., students: discover, drawn upon, break free from, use, take ownership, talk, write, relate)

  1. Creative Dramatics: Biggest/smallest thing; Holding up the roof; Favorite animal; Mirror effect; Imagine taste/smell...
  2. Memorize Strategies.
  3. Break
  4. Student Final Presentations
  5. Break
  6. More Student Final Presentations

 


Extra Handouts

 

 

Sample Creativity Test (R546)

 

 

I. Rate yourself on 1-10 scale (do #21 if you skipped one):

 

SCALE:

1 2 3 4 5                                  6 7 8 9 10

___ 1. censors                                     feels

___ 2. evaluates                                  takes risks

___ 3. reassures & supports                takes risks

___ 4. analyzes                                    makes connections

___ 5. is realistic                                 plays

___ 6. looks at consequences              speculates

___ 7. is logical                                   is curious

___ 8. alert to danger                          sees the fun in things

___ 9. avoids surprises                        likes surprises

___ 10. avoids wrongness                   open to anything

___ 11. punishes wrongness               in touch with total experience

___ 12. is serious                                 does not mind being confused

___ 13. is pessimistic                          is optimistic

___ 14. is judgmental                          focus on what is going for the idea

___ 15. argue                                      waste no energy evaluating early

___ 16. inattention/distant                  listen and interested

___ 17. be noncommittal                    wholly open to being available

___ 18. correct and precise                 set up win/wins--nobody loses

___ 19. dominant/commands              deal with as an equal--eliminate rank

___ 20. point out flaws                       see the value in/assume valuable implic's

___ 21. fearful                                                is impetuous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                         (over)


II. Now rate yourself on the following items on a 1-10 scale (10 being high and 1 being low).

 

SCALE: Low Medium High

 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

___ 1. self-confident

___ 2. risk-taking

___ 3. high in energy

___ 4. stubborn

___ 5. curious

___ 6. playful, childlike

___ 7. resists domination

___ 8. enthusiastic

___ 9. wide interests

___ 10. non-participation in class activities

___ 11. good sense of humor

___ 12. idealistic

___ 13. reflective

___ 14. uncooperative

___ 15. need privacy, alone time

___ 16. artistic interests

___ 17. capriciousness

___ 18. low interest in details

___ 19. too emotional

___ 20. adventurous

___ 21. aesthetic interests

___ 22. attracted to novelty, complexity, and the mysterious

___ 23. sometimes uncommunicative

___ 24. forgetful, absentmindedness, mind wanders

___ 25. egocentric

___ 26. too demanding

___ 27. autonomous

___ 28. open-minded

___ 29. ambitious

___ 30. temperamental

___ 31. sloppiness and disorganization with unimportant matters

___ 32. dresses differently

___ 33. does things different from standard procedures

___ 34. imaginative

___ 35. is full of ideas

___ 36. is a "what if?" person

___ 37. high verbal, conversational ability

___ 38. not afraid to try something new

___ 39. uses all senses in observing

___ 40. ability to regress and transform items


                 Images of Schools (Workplaces) Through Metaphor (ISM): Actual Form

Directions:        Think about where you work or teach. What is it actually like working at this place? Indicate the extent to which you agree/disagree with each of the following 40 metaphors. Rate on a scale of 1 (Strongly Disagree) to 10 (Strongly Agree).

 

___ 1. My school (workplace) is a Mental Straight-jacket.

___ 2. My school (workplace) is a Military Camp.

___ 3. My school (workplace) is a Ghetto.

___ 4. My school (workplace) is a Prison.

___ 5. My school (workplace) is a Family.

___ 6. My school (workplace) is an Artist's Palette.

___ 7. My school (workplace) is a Team.

___ 8. My school (workplace) is a Negotiating Area.

___ 9. My school (workplace) is a Culture.

___ 10. My school (workplace) is an Exhibition.

___ 11. My school (workplace) is an Orchestra.

___ 12. My school (workplace) is a Garden.

___ 13. My school (workplace) is an Expedition.

___ 14. My school (workplace) is a Herd.

___ 15. My school (workplace) is a Museum.

___ 16. My school (workplace) is a Machine.

___ 17. My school (workplace) is a Hospital.

___ 18. My school (workplace) is a Nursery.

___ 19. My school (workplace) is a Labor Ward.

___ 20. My school (workplace) is a Beehive.

___ 21. My school (workplace) is a Living Organism.

___ 22. My school (workplace) is a Theater.

___ 23. My school (workplace) is an International Airport.

___ 24. My school (workplace) is a Refuge.

___ 25. My school (workplace) is an Ocean.

___ 26. My school (workplace) is a Board Game.

___ 27. My school (workplace) is a Camping Trip.

___ 28. My school (workplace) is a Court Room.

___ 29. My school (workplace) is a Monastery.

___ 30. My school (workplace) is a Pressure Cooker.

___ 31. My school (workplace) is a Fraternity Party.

___ 32. My school (workplace) is an Olympic Games.

___ 33. My school (workplace) is a Brew Pub.

___ 34. My school (workplace) is a Zoo.

___ 35. My school (workplace) is an Amusement Park.

___ 36. My school (workplace) is a Casino.

___ 37. My school (workplace) is a Tour Bus.

___ 38. My school (workplace) is a Theme Park.

___ 39. My school (workplace) is a Video Arcade.

___ 40. My school (workplace) is a Laboratory.


                  Images of Schools (Workplaces) Through Metaphor (ISM): Ideal Form

Directions:        Think about where you work or teach. What would you ideally want this place to be like? Then indicate the extent to which you agree/disagree with each of the following 40 metaphors. Rate on a scale of 1 (Strongly Disagree) to 10 (Strongly Agree).

 

___ 1. My school (workplace) is a Mental Straight-jacket.

___ 2. My school (workplace) is a Military Camp.

___ 3. My school (workplace) is a Ghetto.

___ 4. My school (workplace) is a Prison.

___ 5. My school (workplace) is a Family.

___ 6. My school (workplace) is an Artist's Palette.

___ 7. My school (workplace) is a Team.

___ 8. My school (workplace) is a Negotiating Area.

___ 9. My school (workplace) is a Culture.

___ 10. My school (workplace) is an Exhibition.

___ 11. My school (workplace) is an Orchestra.

___ 12. My school (workplace) is a Garden.

___ 13. My school (workplace) is an Expedition.

___ 14. My school (workplace) is a Herd.

___ 15. My school (workplace) is a Museum.

___ 16. My school (workplace) is a Machine.

___ 17. My school (workplace) is a Hospital.

___ 18. My school (workplace) is a Nursery.

___ 19. My school (workplace) is a Labor Ward.

___ 20. My school (workplace) is a Beehive.

___ 21. My school (workplace) is a Living Organism.

___ 22. My school (workplace) is a Theater.

___ 23. My school (workplace) is an International Airport.

___ 24. My school (workplace) is a Refuge.

___ 25. My school (workplace) is an Ocean.

___ 26. My school (workplace) is a Board Game.

___ 27. My school (workplace) is a Camping Trip.

___ 28. My school (workplace) is a Court Room.

___ 29. My school (workplace) is a Monastery.

___ 30. My school (workplace) is a Pressure Cooker.

___ 31. My school (workplace) is a Fraternity Party.

___ 32. My school (workplace) is an Olympic Games.

___ 33. My school (workplace) is a Brew Pub.

___ 34. My school (workplace) is a Zoo.

___ 35. My school (workplace) is an Amusement Park.

___ 36. My school (workplace) is a Casino.

___ 37. My school (workplace) is a Tour Bus.

___ 38. My school (workplace) is a Theme Park.

___ 39. My school (workplace) is a Video Arcade.

___ 40. My school (workplace) is a Laboratory.


Active Learning Assessments (sample questions):

A. Reflection #1: A New Teacher Self-Assessment for active learning. (Bonk, 1995)

Rate: Never = 1; Seldom = 2; Sometimes = 3; Often = 4; Very Often = 5.

In my classes...

___ 1.       students have a say in class activities and tests.

___ 2.       I help students to explore, build, and connect their ideas.

___ 3.       students share their ideas and views with each other and me.

___ 4.       students can relate new terms and concepts to events in their lives

___ 5.       students work in small groups or teams when solving problems.

___ 6.       students use computers to help them organize and try out their ideas.

___ 7.       I give hints and clues for solving problems but do not give away the answers.

___ 8.       I relate new information or problems to what students have already learned.

___ 9.       students prepare answers with a partner or team b/4 sharing ideas with the class.

___ 10.     I ask questions that have more than one answer.

___ 11.     students take sides and debate issues and viewpoints.

___ 12.     students develop ideas from a variety of library and electronic resources.

___ 13.     students bring in information that extends across subject areas or links topics.

___ 14.     students suggest possible problems and tasks.

___ 15.     I provide diagrams or pictures of main ideas to make confusing info clearer.

 

B. Reflection #2: A Dept. Thoughtfulness Report Card: In this dept. (or class):

___ 1. There is sustained examination of few topics, rather than superficial coverage of many.

___ 2. The lessons display substantive coherence.

___ 3. Students are given an appropriate amount of time to think.

___ 4. Teachers carefully consider explanations and reasons for conclusions.

___ 5. Teachers ask challenging questions and structure challenging tasks.

___ 6. Teachers press students to justify or clarify assertions and answers.

___ 7. Teachers try to get students to generate original ideas, explanations, and solutions.

___ 8. Teachers are a model for thoughtfulness.

___ 9. Students assume the roles of questioners and critics.

___ 10. Students offer explanations and reasons for their conclusions.

 

C. Reflection #3: Student Thinking Report Card (Excerpts from Teacher Assessment of Student Thinking from John Barrell, 1991, Teaching for Thoughtfulness, Longman Publishing).

Rating Scale:

1 = completely false (F); 2 = mostly F; 3 = partly F/T; 4 = mostly True; 5 = completely True

___ 1. The student is very interested in ideas.

___ 2. The student works well in discussion groups.

___ 3. The student can express ideas clearly.

___ 4. The student cannot tell which ideas are more important.

___ 5. The student can often combine many ideas into one idea.

___ 6. The student runs out of ideas quickly.

___ 7. The student can often suggest ideas not mentioned before.

___ 8. The students thinking is not well organized.

___ 9. The student is a lazy thinker.

___ 10. The student asks good questions.

___ 11. The student likes to try difficult problems.

___ 12. The student cannot concentrate for too long.

___ 13. The plans the student makes are well thought out.

___ 14. The student has trouble making decisions.

___ 15. The student can think well about a wide range of things.


Big Picture Revisited

a. What can teachers do to "assist" in student learning?

Ten Techniques To Assist In Learning: (Bonk & Kim, in press; Tharp, 1993)

1. Modeling (illustrating and verbalizing invisible performance standards);

2. Directly Instructing (provide clarity, needed content, and missing information);

3. Coaching (observe and supervise in guiding toward expert performance);

4. Scaffolding and Fading (supporting what learner can't do and later removing support);

5. Cognitive Task Structuring (explaining/organizing the task within zones of development);

6. Questioning (requesting a verbal response using a mental function learner can't yet do);

7. Articulating and Dialoguing (encouraging description/summary of reasoning processes);

8. Reflecting (fostering self-reflection and analyses of previous performances);

9. Exploring (pushing student discovery and application of problem solving skills);

10. Managing & Feedback (giving performance feedback and positive reinforcement).

 

b. What resources exist for a lrng environment? (Bonk, Hay, & Fischler, 1996).

Answer is eight different things:

(1) Teachers, (2) Peers, (3) Curriculum/Textbooks, (4) Technology/Tools, (5) Experts/Community,

(6) Assessment/Testing, (7) Self Reflection, (8) Parents.

 

c. Matrix of Active Learning Resources

Directions: Fill in the matrix grid by look at the intersection of resources and teaching techniques and place a plus ("+") to indicate whether it is possible, a negative ("-") to indicate it may not be possible, and a questionmark ("?") when you are uncertain if it is possible.

 

 

 

 

1. Tchrs

 

2. Peers

 

3. Texts

 

4. Tech. Tools

 

5. Experts

 

6. Assess

 

7. Self

 

8. Parents

 

1. Model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Directly Instruct

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Coach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Scaffold & Fade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Cogn. Task Structure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Articulate & Dialogue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Reflect

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Push to Explore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. Manage and Feedback

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


 

Motivation Research Highlights (Brophy)

1. Supportive, appropriate challenge, meaningful, moderation/optimal.

2. Teach goal setting and self-reinforcement.

3. Offer rewards for good/improved performance.

4. Novelty, variety, choice, adaptable to interests.

5. Gamelike, fun, fantasy, curiosity, suspense, active.

6. Higher levels, divergence, dissonance, interact with peers.

7. Allow to create finished products.

8. Provide immediate feedback, advance organizers.

9. Show intensity, enthusiasm, interest, minimize anxiety.

10. Make content personal, concrete, familiar.

 

Other Classroom Motivation Tips (Alexander, class notes, Pintrinch & Schunk, 1996; Reeve, 1996; Stipek, 1998):

1. Include positive before negative comments.

2. Wish students “good effort” not “good luck”.

3. Give flexibility in assignments and due dates.

4. Communicate respect via tasks select and control.

5. Design interactive and interesting activities.

6. Use coop learning, debates, group discussions.

7. Minimize social comparisons and public evaluations.

8. Use relevant, authentic learning tasks.

9. Use optimal difficulty and novelty.

10. Use challenge, curiosity, control, and fantasy.

11. Give challenging but achievable tasks.

12. Create short term or proximal goals and vary these goals.

13. Give students different ways to demo what they know.

14. Encourage students to give and get help.

15. Attrib failure to low effort or ineffective strategy.

(Attrib success to effort or competence)

16. Give poor performing student the role of expert.

 

 


 

 

 

 

150 Ways to Motivate in the Classroom (Raffini, 1996)

1. Ice Breakers

(Treasured objects, birthday circles, treasure hunts, middle name game, accomplishment hunts, similarity wheels, who=s like me, coat of arms, self-disclosure intros, expectations charts, scrambled sayings)

2. Goal Cards, Goal Notebooks

(ST and LT with objectives and ideas how to achieve)

3. Floating A, Escape Clauses, Volunteer Assignments, etc.

(to be used on any assignment within 25 hours)

4. Self Report Cards, Self Evaluation

5. Discussion Questions, Issues, Problems, Solutions

(Perhaps answer questions of the other teams, talking chips)

6. Term Crossword Puzzles or Term Matching, Competitions, Dilemmas

7. Success Contracts and Choice Calenders

(Guarantee an A or B if fulfill contract provisions)

8. Positive Statements, Self Reinforcements

(Bury the “I can’ts” and Save the “I Cans”)

9. Celebrations, Praises, Acknowledgments, Thank Yous, Put-Ups

(Multicultural days, trips, class awards, helpers, end of term)

10. Class Community Building

(Web Site and Digitized Web class photo, photo album, class project, teeshirts, field trips)

11. Democratic Voting, Student Interest Surveys, Class Opinion Polls

12. Random Acts of Kindness, Service Learning/Teaching, Volunteerism

13. Change Roles or Status

(Random roles, assume expert roles, switch roles for a day)



1001 Ways to Energize Employees (Bob Nelson, 1996)

1. Bank of Boston--4 informational days to work on special projects.

2. Honda--places individuals who know nothing about tech in design teams.

3. Hewlett-Packard--takes out of routine by putting new bus plans on trial.

4. Delta Land Survey--employees vote once/year on dress code, bonuses, etc.

5. Tandem Computers--promotions based on technical OR managerial merit.

6. Scitor Corp--no max number of sick days (ave. is 5 days/year--low).

7. Adobe Systems--set own hours & eligible for stock options & sabbaticals.

8. Matsushita--created research lab of 20 scientists free to explore any proj.

9. Dan Corp.--employees can spend $500/project to improve efficiencies.

10. Worthington Industries--majority of employees must approve new hires.

11. Xerox--share ideas no matter rank, time clocks out & teams are in (trust).

12. Hi-Tech Hose--lumps all vacation, sick, & holidays in a single account.

13. Pitney-Bowes--consider displaced persons b4 turning to outside market.

14. Ventura--pushes to take time off outdoors as long as work is done.

15. Lands= End--encourages to express interest in any dept interested in.

16. Microsoft--encourages fun/playfulness (e.g., installing sod, sprinklers, lawn mowers in an office).

17. Walmart--managers wear jeans once/week to help line workers/staff.

18. Duke Power Co.--can post electronic message to change/swap jobs.

19. Saturn--employees can send anonymous messages to upper management.

20. Whole Foods--everyone can access sales, profit margins, & salaries.

21. Diesel Tech Corp--disabled products so employees can see how fit.

22. FedEx--internal newsletter with columns devoted to competitor info.

23. Levi Strauss--employees rate each other on teamwork, trust, communication.

24. Computer Specialists--clients rate workers & employees rate own perf.

25. Queen Mary Resort--brainstorms & votes once/month how to imp jobs.

26. Advanced Micro Devices--managers have quarterly breakfast with boss.

27. Motorola--has quarterly employee town meetings with rap sessions.

28. S.C. Johnson Wax--flew all employees of foreign buy-outs to the U.S.

29. Com-Corp--installed “screwup boxes” to tell manage what doing wrong.

30. Wired Magazine--two “living room” mtg areas--sofas, stereos, CDs, etc.

31. Microsoft--play basketball, frisbee, golf, etc. and be casual at work.

32. Sun Micro--designed forum spaces & sun rooms for spontaneous conversations.

33. Lands End--$9 mil for activ ctr--pool, track, photo, gym, tennis, picnic tables, whirlpool, etc.

34. Southwest Air--1/4 of profit sharing funds must go to company stock.

35. Computer Media Tech--encour volunteer in soup kitchens, elderly homes, etc.

36. Xerox--social service leave program (1 month to a year) with pay.

37. Ben Jerry=s Homemade--set aside 1% of profits for peace programs.

38. Salem Sportswear--anyone with a tie beyond a certain pt is fined $2.

39. Owens-Corning Fiberglass--open space mtg rooms, no agenda, no plans.

40. Nissan--uses Involvement Through Teamwork (ITT) to discuss probs.

41. Siemans Info Sys--created team of 23 young, talented employees under 40 to advise management.

42. Hewlett-Packard--has 24 hour labs for res’ers & encourage to spend 10% on personal projects.

43. AT&T--project team weekly outings to play darts & shoot pool.

44. United Airlines--allowed workers to swap assignments (reduced sick time).

45. Odetics--wacky stuff; telephone booth stuffing contests, bubble gum blowing, >50s day, yoga.

46. Hallmark Greeting Cards--creativity ctr with clay, paint, etc. to think up ideas.

47. Chiat Day (ad agency)--hangs punching bags of execs in break rooms.

48. Alagaso--Pres Mike Warren distrib “Hey Mike” cards & posters in firm.

49. Cooper Tires--for ownership, operators can stamp names inside tires produced.

50. Southwest Air--CEO kissed an employee who turned down a job offer (both males).


 

Some Ice Breakers (Bonk, 1998; Raffini, 1996; Scannell & Newstrom, 1991; Thiagarajan, 1998)

 

1. Ice Breakers

a. Round I: Self-disclosure introductions (who are you, job, interests, hobbies)

2. Round II. Self-disclosure introductions...

a. Treasured Objects--Take out two items out of your wallet and describe how they best represent you (e.g., family pictures, credit cards, rabbits' feet) and share.

b. Describe themselves (e.g., "I am a tightwad," "I am superstitious")

c. State name with an adjective starting with 1st letter of 1st name.

(e.g., Marvelous Mary, Dancing Diane, Inscrutable Ida, Crusty Curt)

d. Now intro self & also by a nickname current, past, or potential nickname.

(ask others what it means during break)

e. Brainstorm a list of questions you would like to ask the others...

(e.g., My person I most admire is? The best book I ever read?)

f. Middle name game (state what middle name is and how you got it).

3. Expectations charts

What do you expect from this workshop, what are your goals, what could you contribute?

a. Write short and long terms goals down on goal cards that can be referenced later on.

b. Write 4-5 expectations for this workshop/retreat

c. Expectations Flip Chart: share of 1-2 of these...

4. Treasure hunts--fill out card with interests, where born, would like to live, strengths, job role, hobbies, etc. and find a match (find one thing in common and one thing different with everyone)

Pass out an Index Card: What is unique about you???

a. Favorite Sports/hobbies/past times (upper left)

b. Birthplace and Favorite cities to visit (upper right)

c. Current Job and Responsibilities (lower left)

d. 2 comments, things, or traits about yourself (e.g., team player, personable, talkative,

opinionated, hate Purdue, like movies, move a lot, hate sports) (lower right)

e. Accomplishments you are proud of (in the middle)

5. Accomplishment Hunt

a. Turn in 2-3 accomplishments (e.g., past summer, during college, during life);

b. Workshop leader lists 1-2 of those for each student on a sheet without names.

c. Participants have to ask "Is this you?" If yes, get a signature.

6. Issues and Discussion Questions

a. make a list of issues people would like to discuss.

b. Perhaps everyone brings 2-3 questions or issues to the meeting.

c. Partner off and create a list and then collect question cards, and,

d. then distribute and your group must answer questions of the other groups.

7. Team brainteasers (IQ tests), scrambled cities, crossword puzzles, competitions, dilemmas, or unscrambled sayings.

8. Coat of Arms--fill in.

#1: a recent Peak Performance;

#2: something very few people know;

#3: draw a symbol of how you spend your free time;

#4: fill in something you are really good at;

#5: write in something that epitomizes your personal motto.

 


 

 

9. It’ll Never Fly Wilbur

a. Introduce a new idea or concept or plan.

b. Everyone writes 4-5 problems they see in it.

c. Divide into groups of 3-4 and discuss concerns.

d. Each group writes down 3 roadblocks on a 3 X 5 card.

e. Facilitator redistributes so each group gets a different card.

f. Subgroups think creatively of how to solve those problems and share with group.

10. Birthday groupings--Nonverbally up by date of year born and partner off with person closest to you in b-day and then do...

11. Talking String--state what hope to gain from retreat (or discuss some other issue) as wrap string around finger; next ones state names of previous people and then state their reasons.

12. Divide into small groups of about six people and then hand out prepared list of 5 questions in increasing order of disclosure for participants to ask each other and then have someone stand and their group must describe him or her.

13. Psychic Massage (a closer activity)

a. Divide in teams of 3-5.

b. In alphabetical order of first names have someone turn his or back to the group

c. Team members must make positive, uplifting statements about that person behind his or her back but loud enough for others to hear them.

d. One minute per person.

14. Positive Strokes

a. 2-3 times during the session, each person fills out a 3 x 5 card about other participants.

b. They must complete sentences like: “the thing I like best about (name) is” and “the biggest improvement I saw in (name) is”.

c. At the end of the day, the folded cards are passed out and read aloud and then given to the named person.

15. Community Building--common teeshirts, photo of group and perhaps put up on the Web. Put announcement of retreat on Web or newsletter.

16. Communication/Learning Visuals--Draw one or more of the following that you want to use during the training: Gun, cannon, noose, high fives, thumbs up, watch, toilet, smiley face, etc.

17. Ask how feel, what has happened, what did they learn, how might this help in workplace, ask “what if” things were different at work, and what’s next???--how might they do things differently?

18. Have you ever questions:

1. Been in a parade, performed the Heimlich maneuver, walked on stilts, surfed, drank more than 10 cups of coffee in a 24 hour period, owned a watch for more than 10 years, tried on a straight jacket, been to a morgue, laid down inside a casket, ridden in a Rolls Royce, swum a mile in an ocean, drunk more than 25 imported beers during your life, owned a Rolex watch, been a Boy Scout or Girl Scout, shaved your head, flown in an ultra-light, flown a plane, ditched a blind date, owned a car that cost more than $35,000, water skied on one ski, sky dived, bungee jumped, whitewater rafted a dangerous river, been in a play, milked a goat or a cow, done back-to-back all-nighters, completed a marathon, broken a bone, made an obscene gesture at someone when driving your car, cheated on your income tax, had a permanent tattoo, run a toll booth, had a hot cup of coffee spill on your lap, been in the CN Tower in Toronto, been above the Arctic circle or below the Antarctic Circle, been in sauna or hot tub in the mountains, etc.